tips to help you study

tips to help you study

We know how it goes, finals creep around the corner and suddenly you feel completely unprepared. A gut wrenching moment takes place in which you feel as though you haven’t attended class all semester and you’ll never be able to pass. Never fear, we’ve put together five tried-and-true study tips that will not only help you prepare for finals, but they are tips that you can apply from the very beginning of the semester to help you bypass that heart-stopping finals fear.

  1.  Don’t wait until the end of the semester, start reviewing your notes right after class. Don’t have time after class? Later in the day or the next day will do the trick. Either way, homework aside- spend some time rereading your notes. Is there a concept you don’t quite understand? Make a mental note. This will help you be more alert for that concept during your next lecture.
  2. Remember that concept you’re struggling with? Hit the textbook. Not all test questions will come from your lecture notes. Be sure to actually crack the book that corresponds to the class. The ideal time to do this would be after each lecture and note review; however, if you’ve fallen behind, be sure to look up anything you’re unclear about in the book.
  3. Break it up. Finals typically happen over one to two weeks. You may be temped to throw all your energy into your first test and move on from there, but that can be detrimental. Instead allot time to study. Say you’re studying for two hours and you have four finals – spend thirty minutes on each subject. Don’t just study one subject for long periods of time. By studying in this manner you’re teaching your brain to further develop problem solving skills. If you’re to study the same subject for long periods of time, you’ll become accustomed to what is to happen. For example,  you’re studying algebra, you’ll have trained your mind what to look for; however, when you switch subjects, say to English, you come out of “algebra” mode and are required to look at the next subject in a different light. Hey, you solved a problem.
  4. DO NOT, we repeat, DO NOT pull an all-nighter. You think you’re helping yourself, but you’re not. In fact, sleep deprivation can lead to decreased cognitive performance – you know what that means, no easy A.
  5. Test yourself. You’re preparing for a test, so what better way to study than to actually test yourself. If you’re starting at the beginning of the semester, keep a log of all your quizzes and midterms, mix and match questions to help you prepare for the final. If you’re starting a little late, read through your notes and develop questions. Consider using flashcards so you can rotate through different questions at a faster pace.

Most important of all, remember you can do this! It’s your time to shine.